Danielle McGuire, PhD is an award-winning author and historian of the African American freedom struggle. Her first book, At the Dark End of the Street (Knopf) won the Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians and the Lillian Smith Book Award. Her next book, Murder in the Motor City: the 1967 Detroit Riot and American Injustice will be published by Knopf. McGuire is a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians and has appeared on CNN, CBS, Fox2 Detroit, National Public Radio, BookTV (CSPAN) and dozens of local radio stations throughout the world. Her essays have appeared in the Journal of American History, the Journal of Civil and Human Rights, Politics and Gender, CNN.com, the Hollywood Reporter, the Huffington Post, TheGrio.com, TheRoot.com. She lives with her husband and two children in metro Detroit.

Current Project:
Murder in the Motor City: The 1967 Detroit Riot and American Injustice

The story of the Algiers Motel murders and subsequent trials, the main narrative thread of Murder in the Motor City, captures, in its tragic horror, the often hidden infrastructure of northern racism and white supremacy. From rabid residential segregation and job discrimination to racialized and sexual violence to ecumenic and educational disparities and the everyday injustices and biased sentencing in the judicial system, racial inequality and segregation in Detroit was every bit as virulent as it was in the South. Maybe even worse.
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Book Launch Party! Detroit 1967: Origins, Impacts, Legacies

Book Launch Party! Detroit 1967: Origins, Impacts, Legacies

Join us for the party! I am still working on my book about the 1967 Algiers Motel murders in Detroit.  But you can hear a sneak peak of my findings at the launch party for a new book on the 1967 Detroit uprising. This collection of essays investigates the origins and aftermaths of the 1967 Detroit

Rosa Parks and SNCC Freedom Singers: Warriors for freedom and human rights
Rosa Parks and SNCC Freedom Singers: Warriors for freedom and human rights

This was probably one of the highlights of my career (so far). In this panel put together by the Central Ohio Transit Center, I joined a conversation with SNCC Freedom Singers Charles Neblett, Rutha Harris, and Betty Mae Fykes about the “power of one.” The first part of the video features the SNCC Freedom Singers

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Interview: Rape of Recy Taylor was a catalyst for Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955
Interview: Rape of Recy Taylor was a catalyst for Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955

Listen to an interview between Danielle McGuire and Marty Moss-Coane on WHYY in Philadelphia (2010) You know one story about Rosa Parks, but not this one: The woman who gained worldwide fame when she “refused to give up her seat” on a Montgomery bus was also a radical activist and a top NAACP investigator into

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Podcast: The Rape of Recy Taylor on Rock the Schools with Citizen Stewart
Podcast: The Rape of Recy Taylor on Rock the Schools with Citizen Stewart

Episode 83 I Black History Month – “At The Dark End Of The Street” with Danielle McGuire and Beth Hubbard Author of “At The Dark End Of The Street” Danielle McGuire, and Producer of “The Rape of Recy Taylor” Beth Hubbard, provide a powerful history lesson in honor of Black History month by recognizing the

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Reviews

Praise for Danielle McGuire's most recent book: At the Dark End of the Street

Just when we thought there couldn’t possibly be anything left to uncover about the civil rights movement, Danielle McGuire finds a new facet of that endlessly prismatic struggle at the core of our national identity. By reinterpreting black liberation through the lens of organized resistance to white male sexual aggression against African-American women, McGuire ingeniously upends the white race’s ultimate rationale for its violent subjugation of blacks—imputed black male sexual aggression against white women. It is an original premise, and At the Dark End of the Street delivers on it with scholarly authority and narrative polish.

Diane McWhorter
Diane McWhorterPulitzer Prize Winner for Carry Me Home: The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution

McGuire’s “new history” shines fresh light upon the germinal role of black women in the birth and development of the civil rights movement.

Publisher’s Weekly
Publisher's Weekly

Following the lead of pioneers like Darlene Clark Hine, Danielle McGuire details the all too ignored tactic of rape of black women in the everyday practice of southern white supremacy. Just as important, she plots resistance against this outrage as an integral facet of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. This book is as essential as its history is infuriating.

Nell Irvin Painter
Nell Irvin Painterauthor of The History of White People

This gripping story changes the history books, giving us a revised Rosa Parks and a new civil rights story. You can’t write a general U.S. history without altering crucial sentences because of McGuire’s work. Masterfully narrated, At the Dark End of the Street presents a deep civil rights movement with women at the center, a narrative as poignant, painful and complicated as our own lives.

Timothy B. Tyson
Timothy B. TysonNational Book Award Finalist for Blood Done Sign My Name: A True Story

At the Dark End of the Street is one of those rare studies that makes a well-known story seem startlingly new. Anyone who thinks he knows the history of the modern civil rights movement needs to read this terrifying, illuminating book.

Kevin Boyle
Kevin BoyleNational Book Award-winner for Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights and Murder in the Jazz Age

McGuire’s provocative narrative forces readers to rethink what they know about that pivotal moment in U.S. history: its time frame, its actors, its legacy.

Ms. Magazine
Ms. Magazine

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